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File:Steamboat Porter's Lodge, Rhue - geograph.org.uk - 510439.jpg

Steamboat_Porter's_Lodge,_Rhue_-_geograph.org.uk_-_510439.jpg(640 × 427 pixels, file size: 78 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)

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English: Steamboat Porter's Lodge, Rhue The Porter's Lodge was built around 1887. An article written by Pat McCarthy, who lived there described ...

"Still to be seen in the 'waiting room' are the wood mouldings which carried the coat-hangers.. as there would rest the gentry and the well-to-do travellers until the steamer would be sighted. The steamers would sound blasts on their sirens as they approached the mouth of the harbour, where they would lie at anchor while the passengers and cargo were brought out from the pier in a big red barge known as An bata dearg - the red boat.

Wind, tide and weather would often cause delays, and there was no means of knowing what was happening, or when the steamer would come. A watch was posted, and when the steamer was sighted the alarm would be given, and there would be a desperate scramble to get aboard the barge for fear of missing the sailing. Many times it happened that, when all was ready, the steamer would go sailing on, and then it would be 'as you were' until the next sailing. No explanations were given for not calling. The steamer coming from the north was more subject to delays caused by tides, fog or adverse conditions. The steamers called at Lochinver in Sutherland, and then went on to Stornoway in Lewis. There would be much disappointment to those set on a voyage to Glasgow if the ship failed to call. Often this would happen, and she would be seen ploughing majestically westward as she made for the point of Ardnamurchan and the Clyde.

The goods landed in these days would consist mostly of flour, cereal, maize meal, salt and sugar in bulk. My grandmother often told how she would have to leave her household chores, and go and help grandfather unload the barge, toiling at the crane until all was safely landed. My grandfather would have paid a man to help with this sort of work, but there was not always one available."

Article can be found here http://www.road-to-the-isles.org.uk/westword/oct2000.html
Date
Source From geograph.org.uk
Author Lisa Jarvis
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Lisa Jarvis / Steamboat Porter's Lodge, Rhue / CC BY-SA 2.0
Lisa Jarvis / Steamboat Porter's Lodge, Rhue
Camera location56° 53′ 50″ N, 5° 53′ 53″ W  Heading=90° Kartographer map based on OpenStreetMap.View this and other nearby images on: OpenStreetMap - Google Earthinfo
Object location56° 53′ 52″ N, 5° 53′ 40″ W  Heading=90° Kartographer map based on OpenStreetMap.View this and other nearby images on: OpenStreetMap - Google Earthinfo

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This image was taken from the Geograph project collection. See this photograph's page on the Geograph website for the photographer's contact details. The copyright on this image is owned by Lisa Jarvis and is licensed for reuse under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 license.
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Attribution: Lisa Jarvis
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current13:58, 5 February 2011Thumbnail for version as of 13:58, 5 February 2011640 × 427 (78 KB)GeographBot (talk | contribs)== {{int:filedesc}} == {{Information |description={{en|1=Steamboat Porter's Lodge, Rhue The Porter's Lodge was built around 1887. An article written by Pat McCarthy, who lived there described ... "Still to be seen in the 'waiting room' are the wood mo
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